The Resurrection Has Begun!

William Morris has returned from the dead. Go and see A Motley Vision!

But, as I’m never one to squander a fantastic title, can someone please explain to me 1st resurrection, 2nd resurrection, and who gets up in the morning, and who’s in the afternoon? And doctrine, please — no secondhand texts allowed. Better still, perhaps someone could explain to me why it matters? Or, if this is just crazy talk, please let me know.

Comments

  1. Steve Evans says:

    mmmmm….. resurrection waffles….

  2. D. Fletcher says:

    Ooh, that sounds really good! Of course, I have waffles frozen in my freezer which I resurrect from time to time — only last about a year or so before they taste kinda “frosty.”

  3. I was going to suggest resurrection bagels and lox, but then I wondered if we were going to have to give up on eating fish. Or do we still get to kill critters during the Millenium?

  4. Steve Evans says:

    Mark, would it be heaven if we couldn’t kill critters?

  5. I guess it depends on whether or not there are ever “times of famine” in heaven.

  6. D. Fletcher says:

    Of course, we’re dealing with symbols Steve. The first song in our hymnbook is “the morning breaks…” did you think it referred to Sunday morning? It’s about the dawning of a new age — there’s that word, “dawning,” which is a lovely way to say, the return of the light.

  7. I suppose “the late afternoon sidles lazily in” isn’t quite as dramatic.

  8. I just don’t want to miss breakfast.

  9. Steve Evans says:

    Frank, the sealing of course is the most immediate iterance that comes to mind, but I guess I do not quite grasp the significance of getting out of the grave a few hours earlier. Perhaps we are dealing with symbolic times?

  10. D. Fletcher says:

    Of course, we’re dealing with symbols Steve. The first song in our hymnbook is “the morning breaks…” did you think it referred to Sunday morning? It’s about the dawning of a new age — there’s that word, “dawning,” which is a lovely way to say, the return of the light.

  11. Steve, go do some temple sealings.

    The 3 best takes on it, for me, are:
    Abinadi in Mosiah 15.

    Alma (Abinadi’s doctrinal grandson) reviews for the slow learners in Alma 40 (and adds some personal speculation).

    Lastly, we get the big picture in D&C 76.

    William, welcome back to the living.

  12. It’s only a matter of time before the no-thinking hogs/logs of our generation are able to impede the mighty Mississipp…we shall rise again

  13. D. Fletcher says:

    I’m unemployed, so I don’t have to get up until about 9:30.

  14. Me too, D.!

    I think the people that are resurrected in the afternoon will be neutered.

  15. Julie in Austin says:

    Morning = Franklin-planner types

    Afternoon = Procrastinators

    (It really isn’t that complicated.)

  16. Will the righteous dead who do not have their temple work done before the Second Coming be resurrected before their temple work is done? That’s what I’m wondering. Any one want to take a stab at that?

  17. Steve Evans says:

    What if we want to sleep in?? I’m tired of 9 AM church, I can’t imagine getting up at dawn for a resurrection.

  18. I’m thinking late afternoon/early evening is in the works for me (I hope).

    But back to the real topic:

    Thanks for the plug — you’ve doubled my traffic. What with T&S taking strange wives (i.e. all of their gentile links), I now proclaim BCC the official Blogalanche King of the Bloggernacle.

  19. Steve Evans says:

    Wm, we don’t like to throw our weight around too lightly, but when the torrent of BCC comes it is like a raging river. You would just as well try to reach your puny arm into the mighty Mississippi as to stop the BCCites from visiting your blog.

  20. I too have to push the I-Wonder-button when I hear that terminology. Patriarchal blessings often assure the individual a resurrection in the morning of the 1st. So too do the dedications of graves. Yet resurrected folk were walking around Jerusalem 2,000 years ago. That is one long morning, eh?

    The terminonolgy was used back in the 1840’s in relation eternal mairrage and to having one’s calling and election made sure (which is substantially different than the conditional sealing used in the Patriarchal blessings). In the 19th century there was often verbiage used like: “come forth in the morning of the first resurrection, clothed with glory, immortality and eternal lives.” (taken form sever General Conference talks)

    So, I tend to view the morning of the first resurrection as those was have received all the ordinances of the Temple – even though there may be those resurrected before them that have not received them all.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 9,484 other followers