Requiem for a Scooter

Last month, my father-in-law and I loaded up and tied down one of my last pretensions of youth: a 2000 50cc Italjet Torpedo Scooter. He hauled it off to an outbuilding on his farm, where it now rests with my sister-in-law’s half-stripped Volkswagen bug and a wooden boat that is literally generations in the making. [Read more...]

The Intellectual Pleasures of Mormonism

Neal Kramer, a friend of BCC, returns again to post. See his earlier post here.

I believe it is fair to say that many intellectuals have found Mormonism rather stultifying. [Read more...]

Bike Blogging – Pictures! (Updated!)

It’s one thing to talk about bicycling, but as Edgar A. Guest, BCC’s poet laureate said: I’d rather see a sermon than hear one anyday. I was inspired by mfranti and dan ellsworth to take some pictures this morning of my cycling route, and I’m posting them for your enjoyment. Remember, envy is one of the seven cardinal sins.

[Read more...]

Memorial Day: The Costs of War and Those Who Bear Them

What follows are my thoughts for Memorial Day, generated in no small part from extended conversation and correspondence with a family member of mine this weekend. Jon (not his real name) is a veteran of the Iraq war. [Read more...]

Desert Ranches in the News

Two ranches are featured in today’s U.S. headlines: [Read more...]

The Core of a Mormon Man

The assertion has been made in hundreds of media articles, blog posts, and comments to both that there was no core to Mitt Romney as a presidential candidate — that he seemed phony, plastic, robotic, and of course, that he seemed to have flip-flopped on issues. [Read more...]

Church Finances

A few observations:

  • Another lawyer on another vendetta is pressing to know just how much the church is worth, as various recent articles have chronicled.
  • I have dear friends skeptical about the use of tithing for BYU or political campaigns like the gay marriage movement who have elected to pay their 10% to other charitable organizations.
  • Americans since the early 1830s have distrusted Mormonism, labeling it a scam to enrich a few at the expense of the many. These critics have also labeled Mormonism as secretive to a dangerous extent.
  • Many LDS feel that requiring reporting of church assets demonstrates a lack of faith in church leadership.
  • Americans love to talk about money and wealth. Several books have been written hoping to look inside the church’s coffers. One reporter seems to have made it his specialty.

Before thinking this through again in light of the Oregon case, I think I probably could have been persuaded either way. Since pondering the issue, I find that I have one major reservation about disclosing the financial statements of the church.
[Read more...]

A Presidential Cultist

A citizen may have many good reasons to avoid voting for Mitt Romney, but his adherence to a religion some look upon as a cult is not one of them. [Read more...]

SAHM Hell

You might be tired of the topics of childbearing and childraising, and think there is nothing more to be said, but stay with me here. I want to offer yet another perspective. [Read more...]

Not Good, but Not Bad either

In RT’s recent post, he asks us to consider the relative value of truth as obtained from Church authority vs. everyone else in the world (combined). Here, I would like us to consider the threadjack that has recently sort of developed in that thread. The threadjack regards birth control and how it has been preached in the twentieth century. [Read more...]

Meth and the Mormon Menace

There are many new things to learn when moving into the Mormon Culture Region. I have now encountered methamphetamine abuse (in the Northeast, there’s plenty of drug abuse, just no meth per se that I ever encountered), and I have now encountered a set of conspiracy theories that blame Mormonism and/or its culture for a variety of social woes. I have learned (incorrectly, though repeated on national television) that Mormon women use a disproportionate amount of anti-depressant drugs (one of the more confusing claims, given the medical consensus for ensuring that depression is adequately treated), Mormons are to blame for the extremely high rates of prescription narcotic abuse (though these data are never compared with total narcotic abuse statistics), and most recently for me, Mormons are to blame for Utah having the “third-highest rate” of meth abuse in the nation (despite actual federal statistics–http://drugabusestatistics.samhsa.gov/2k5/meth/meth.htm–indicating that in the afflicted West, Utah is lower than average). [Read more...]

On being an anonymous satirist (or, at least, trying)

I have a confession to make. I am the chief mind behind the weblog, The Ironic Priesthood. It was a relatively short-lived anonymous humor site that made fun of the BYU Daily Universe and occasional mega-threads in the bloggernacle. I started it for the reason that I believe most people start such things: I was tired of seeing the same old arguments and I figured that I would lampoon the elements of those arguments that I found most ridiculous. Or sometimes I would see something that I thought was silly or incredibly wrong-headed and I would want to try and show why with humor. In any case, it was a project that consumed most of my last summer and then I got too busy to work on it anymore.
[Read more...]

Sit-in at BYU’s JFSB Quad

Demonstrators, April 4, 2007, BYU

Demonstrators, April 4, 2007, BYU

Here’s a shot of today’s demonstration/sit-in/protest at BYU. By my rough estimate, there were about 250 students and faculty participating at any one time, with a total count during the 2 hours of 700-800 (not counting passers-by).

Some of the signs hoisted by the participants were:
“One Nation under…..Surveillance.”
“That’s Ok, I didn’t need my civil rights anyway.”
“Cheney should go to…..BYU.”
“You Lied [under large photo of Cheney] — They Died [with large photo of Bush made up of 1" photos of what may have been servicemen and women].”
“Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Torture.” [Read more...]

A F-email Problem

Recently a friend of mine sent me an email containing the following. It had been given to his wife at a church function. Somehow she managed to not immediately crumple it up and burn it, instead she passed it on to her husband so he could read it incredulously, too. [Read more...]

Neighbors and the Tragic Commons

I had a long talk with a friend and colleague about the experience of being not Mormon in the midst of Mormondom. One example this friend provided of a frustration with the institution of Mormonism is the presence of Seminary buildings adjacent to the campuses of public secondary schools and the existence of so-called “released-time” in which non-participants are ghetto-ized while participants receive their religious education without any additional time commitment on their part.

By way of confession and disclaimer, I have a memory of a ninth grade seminary teacher invoking the anti-Christ clause to eject me from class (I was preaching evolution in a rather insulting tone), and playing a tenth-grade teacher’s pious hopes of my eventual submission by using “released time” to get something to eat at the local diner until I was fully and finally ejected from the seminary program for truancy. (I went on to teach Institute classes part time toward the end of college in partial penance.) As far as my view as a parent, if we live in a setting where our children are offered “released time” at the relevant time in their lives, I think we would allow them to participate, though we would not push them to do so.

[Read more...]

Fighting the Good Fight

When we think about morality in our personal lives, we often focus on the simple, mundane choices that we face. Should we pay our tithing or not? How hard should we work at our jobs? How should we react when others criticize us? These are indeed moral choices, yet all of us face larger, more defining decisions every day. Let me sketch one such decision that we all currently face, as well as my belief about what the moral decision is — and some of the reasons that I’m not making that moral choice.

The longstanding genocidal conflict in the Darfur region of the Sudan has spread into the eastern regions of neighboring Chad. As in Darfur, Arab militias from Chad and from across the border in the Sudan (called the janjaweed) are now slaughtering black African residents of the region wholesale. There are political aspects of the struggle, but much of the killing seems purely racial, purely genocidal. [Read more...]

Uh-oh.

Bill Maher’s HBO show stirred-up some nice Mormon bashing this week. Maher’s position is that all religions are crazy and the notion that only a “person of faith” should inhabit the White House is something to be raged against. But for Maher (whom I generally like, btw), Mormonism is especially “crazy.” [Read more...]

Especially for Theologians: A Report from the First-Ever Faith & Knowledge Conference

Jana Riess comes to us as one of the regular Dialogue participants.

I just returned from a very encouraging conference for young Mormon scholars–the first-ever gathering of LDS graduate students who are getting advanced degrees in theology and religious studies. About 40 such students, plus a few spouses, convened at Yale Divinity School on Friday and Saturday. We had folks from Harvard, Yale, Princeton, UNC, Claremont, Iliff, the University of Durham, and the GTU, and I’m sure I’m forgetting a few schools. (All of our sessions were held in the RSV translation room, which felt very auspicious and cool.)

Sixteen students presented papers on everything from the Deutero-Isaiah theory and the Book of Mormon to the question of whether an LDS scholar is ipso facto a defender of the faith. All these papers were sandwiched between some great opening remarks by Richard Bushman, who helped conceive and organize the conference, and a closing session by Terryl Givens, who gave us a fascinating sneak preview of his cultural history of Mormonism, due out in August from Oxford University Press. [Read more...]

The Sacrifice of Service

The following notice was published in the Nauvoo Neighbor in Jan 1844.

December_2006_carn-help-the-poor

This announcement, probably meant to benefit German immigrants living in the sixth ward, warmed my heart and made me think of a church functioning as a Christian community. I wanted to imagine myself stumbling out across the ice of the Mississippi to gather wood for my destitute coreligionists.

But then I read on, placing the notice in immediate context. [Read more...]

What is a poor non-member to do?

It seems to me that we expect too much of non-members. I once attended a meeting in which a non-member scholar was criticized for reading the footnotes in the scriptures as if they were canonized. It is an easy mistake to make; one which I would imagine an awful lot of church members make. How was a minimally informed interested observer to know that the footnotes, while nice, are not considered authoritative? Nonetheless, this commentator was dressed down for his ignorance.

Obviously, in writing about this, I am writing about Andrew Sullivan, whose motivations, in spite of the accusations bandied about, remain unclear. Furthermore, I am writing it about that pastor from a couple of weeks ago who stumbled upon an anti-site and used it, and her own collected cult knowledge, to offer a depiction of the church that relied too heavily on long unmentioned and unused doctrines of the 19th century. Let’s assume, just for the moment, that these people are making honest mistakes and set aside the vast secret-combination theories.

Is it any wonder? [Read more...]

George W. Bush is not a man of God

George W. Bush is not a man of God…at least not my God. There is a possibility that he is devoted to some other God. I may even speculate about that as we move along. [Read more...]

Random Sampler

As the powers that be have failed to do their hometeaching for the past couple of months (and yes, as your unofficial 2nd counsellor in your BCC elders quorum, I am calling you to repentance, Steve and Ronan), I have taken it upon myself to emulate another section of the Ensign. Or, failing that, I would like to write a series of brief notes, because I don’t have enough material at the moment for one long post. [Read more...]

“All Major Political Parties”

The hot church-related news of the week involves this year’s variant on the traditional statement on political parties. In addition to the standard instructions about not using church buildings for political purposes and participating in the democratic process, this year’s statement contains something new. According to the Salt Lake Tribune, the statement says:

Principles compatible with the gospel may be found in the platforms of all major political parties.

[Read more...]

Suffer the Little Children (To Give Tax Credits to Wealthy Families)

In President Bush’s press conference of November 4, 2004, our fearless leader stated that, “We must reform our complicated and outdated tax code.” And reform it the government has certainly done. The Oxford English Dictionary suggests a wide range of possible definitions of the word “reform.” The two most relevant to this year’s changes in the tax code are: (a) “To make a change for the better in (an arrangement, state of things, practice or proceeding, institution, etc.); to amend or improve by removal of faults or abuses,” and (b) “ironically: to alter to a worse state.” Which kind of “reform,” then, has been made to the tax code? [Read more...]

In Harm’s Way

It has been a tough couple of months for LDS missionaries (see here and here and here). In response, Elder Ballard met with members of the media on Friday to discuss the topic of missionary safety, as reported in an online Deseret News article Safety of Missionaries is Priority, LDS Leader Says. We all sympathize, of course, with family and friends of these (or any) missionaries who die or are injured while serving in the field. Few tragedies go deeper than the death of a loved one, whatever the circumstances. But this post is about the policy side of the issue, not the personal side. How exactly does LDS policy treat the issue of missionary safety?

[Read more...]

December 1, 1955

Just last week, I wondered if she’d make it. After all, December 1 is the 50th anniversary of Rosa Parks’ refusal to get up and yield her seat to a white man. As it turns out, the day will be celebrated and remembered without her.

[Read more...]

My New Dialogue Subscription

Due to By Common Consent’s recent affiliation with Dialogue, I have revisited the idea of subscribing to the journal. So, for the fist time in my life, I will subscribe to an independent publication focused around Mormonism. Doesn’t sound like a big deal, right? Well, for me it is, and here’s why:

[Read more...]

Church Growth: Zero

Peggy Stack has a very interesting article in the Salt Lake Tribune today that confirms what some keen observers have been suggesting online for a few years now: The Mormon Church is being outstripped in growth by other faiths, and is struggling to maintain converts.

[Read more...]

Become Part of the One

Tomorrow is a series of concerts called Live 8. They are being held to bring awareness to African poverty, disease, and overwhelming debt. You can watch them on MTV, VH1, and other stations. I know I’ve been accused of oversimplifying the dilemma of poverty around the world, and maybe I have. But when you strip away all the geopolitical constraints, the corrupt leaders of foreign nations, and the American excuses, there’s just no good reason why thousands of people should starve to death today. But they will. How is an eight-year old girl supposed to go to school when she has to walk five miles for clean water, then carry it back home? I believe with all my soul, with every fiber of my being, that we have the power to end this suffering. Go to www.one.org today and sign your name to the petition. Contribute generously to Mormon charities – they do a remarkable job of aiding those who need it most.

Dealing with Anti-Mormon Media

Every so often, mormons find themselves depicted unfavorably in the media: Krakauer writes Under the Banner of Heaven; the French version of Witness translates ‘Amish’ as ‘mormon'; or some prominent local mormon gets involved in a scandal of some sort. These are recurring themes. Rarely are the criticisms levelled at the Church new or original. However, their mere presence as a social force requires our response. What, then, is the appropriate response for Church members towards such media portrayals?
[Read more...]

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