Your Monday poll #14

[poll=93]

Comments

  1. oops, I justread the word “other”and went for it. My answer is probably too pious….

    It’s 7 am and my 4year old girl is curled up in my arms…

  2. That is indeed happiness, Matt, and it’s not pious. But is it Mormon? (Maybe, depending on how far Mormonism informs that happiness.)

  3. Watching South Park and seeing heaven depicted as a place where people wear white shirts, ties, and bicycle helmets.

  4. (I trust comment # 3 is a few notches below pious.)

  5. Seeing guys with suits and ties knock at your door and being glad instead of afraid.

  6. Feeling ecstatic for being sick the first Sunday of the month so you can skip church.

    (Should I feel bad for admitting that?)

  7. We should be able to vote for more than one!

  8. Jennifer in GA says:

    Gah! *SO* many good choices! :D

    I almost went for the smell of new garments, but church ending ten minutes early won the day.

  9. A Turtle Named Mack says:

    Arising on a Sunday morning to the realization that it is “optional attendance day” (ie. Stake Conference).

  10. “Other”

    Non-pious:
    My daughters asking me questions about Christ after Primary, hoping that what their teachers taught them were “right”. (and they were)

    More pious:
    My parents, all of my siblings, my husband, and all of my siblings’ spouses in the Temple together.

  11. How about when church ends sooner than 10 minutes late.

  12. Church ending 10 minutes early would only be cool if everyone’s meeting ends 10 minutes early. (If I’m out early none of the rest of my family is. I hate standing around in crowded halls so I end up in the car alone for 10 minutes.)

  13. Susan – we have sacrament last so we all finish together! It was great last week when it happened (it was actually 15 minutes early!)

    I chose finishing early, but could have easily gone for *that* child, since last year it was mine! :)

  14. It’s a little tough not to pick “That kid…” when that kid happens to be yours.

  15. Family night treats, finding yourself unconsciously swaying while singing ‘Master the Tempest Is Raging,’ smart-ass comments in priesthood meeting, the kids shouting out ‘We Are a Happy Family’ in the store, realizing you know the guy behind the veil, laughing during family prayers (usually because somebody farted), High priest sauna night …

  16. This is pretty far down the piety ladder, but for me one of the joys is the delighted laughter of a pretty, married Mormon sister. I can’t explain why, but that particular phenomenon just makes me warm.

  17. Norbert,
    I wish High Priest sauna night could be rolled out across the church. If our paths cross in Finland this summer, please arrange such an event.

  18. I learn so much on this site. About such a very wide range of subjects.

  19. Hi on the Mormon list is not having to go to church for legitimate reasons, like a snow day. It’s not that I dislike going to church, quite the opposite, but it’s like a free day with no guilt!

    The other day our youngest daughter was slightly ill, and I said to the wife casually, “I’m calling dibs on taking care of the kid.” Her eyes got wide and she fired back that as the mother, it was only natural that she take care of her ailing child. I thought we were going to have to call a referee to settle the cage match that was about to ensue. Luckily for us our daughter got better. =)

  20. Mormon happiness is paying a full tithing on gross income, a generous fast offering, a hefty contribution to the PEF and letting everyone know about it. 8)

  21. Mormon happiness is the relief felt after giving a talk or a lesson or the joy of watching your child give a talk that he/she prepared with little or no help.

  22. Sandra and I lived in the DC Branch (later to become the Chevy Chase Ward) for six years. For much of that time, our meeting schedule ended with sacrament meeting. When Lou Hampton became our branch president (later bishop), he instituted a simple policy: the sacrament meeting was never allowed to go overtime. Yes, even for fast & testimony meeting, he’d bring the meeting to a timely close, leaving people sitting on the stand if necessary.

    What’s better, if the speakers during a regular sacrament meeting ended early, Lou never felt the need to somehow fill up the remaining time, either by speaking himself or by inviting members up from the congregation. Instead, we’d just end the meeting and dismiss early. This had the wonderful effect of encouraging speakers to keep their remarks brief, which in turn meant that church regularly let out anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes early. It’s amazing in retrospect the psychological uplift of that early release, though the poll above indicates that it’s real.

    This idyllic time came to an end when circumstances (another ward needing to use the building for several months while theirs was being renovated) forced us to change our meeting schedule so that sacrament meeting came first. But it was great while it lasted. ..bruce..

  23. Bruce,
    There is a special place in heaven reserved for Lou Hampton.

  24. I think the church should implement an institution-wide “Lou Hampton Rule” and it should apply not only to sacrament meetings, but also (especially?) to bishopric, PEC, stake PEC, stake presidency, etc. meetings as well.

    I’m quite confident that there is no element of church activity; no aspect of church history; no idiosyncrasy of church membership that has been more of a challenge to my faith and patience than the tendency in the church for unnecessarily-long meetings. It drives me crazy! Nuts! Berserk! I literally had to ask to be released as the stake exec secretary because I realized that if I remained in the calling even one more month I was going to go utterly bonkers. It was the call or my continued activity in the church.

    I don’t know how some people are capable of doing it. But I guess I’m glad they are so that I don’t have to.

  25. “That kid” is always my kid. *sigh*

  26. When we refer to “the kid’ are we talking about the kid who causes all the trouble, or the kid that stand on their chair to wave and blow kisses to you throughout the program?

  27. In my case – “the kid” – my 4 year old (W in the zeitcast)- spoke really loudly into the microphone saying “Bye-bye!” to everyone.

  28. Sitting alone in Sacrament meeting and having nobody come up to you and ask you to do something.

    Is that un-pious enough? LOL

  29. Josh Smith says:

    Other:

    Stepping out into the hall for some air during Priesthood session. That first breath is such a relief after 45 minutes of back-of-the-throat stinky breath.

  30. I want to revote. I voted for “reveling in the kitsch of a Mormon bookstor” until I realized that we were talking about the majority of a Deseret Book that is without books. I was thinking more about the upstairs at Sam Weller’s on Main in Salt Lake, and specifically, “The Vault”. Saw an original Nauvoo Legion sword and scabbard in there once. Beats the heck out of Angel Moroni socks.

  31. Kevin Barney says:

    When Christmas Eve or Christmas falls on a Sunday, the stake gives strict orders that the full three-hour block is to be observed, and the bishop dismisses everyone after the Christmas program anyway. (This actually happened in our ward once. The bishop in question was duly and severely punished–by being brought into the stake presidency!)

  32. “wholesome recreational activities”

  33. I would definately have to go with the wedding night dream. Those dreams are the only thing that kept me from violating any commandments as a teenager.

  34. Melissa S. says:

    Mormon happiness is going to lunch with your girlfriends (which includes all those you visit teach) early in the month and then having one of them say at the end “oh, you can count this as your visiting teaching.” And then all the rest agree: “We’ll call you if we need anything.”

    No visiting teaching to do and still the ability to report 100% with no guilt.

  35. Watching the original Johnny Lingo for the umpteenth time

  36. Walking into the clerk’s office after sacrament meeting and realizing that there was nothing to do, and that I could attend gospel doctrine.

  37. Ray (#32) wins

  38. Re: post-mission movies, my first was The Wedding Singer at a Mormon-friend’s party. She raved about the classic ’80s music. I couldn’t help but think it was one of the most vile things I had seen. Dirty, filthy, Sandler tripe.

    Not too long after that, the first post-mission movie I saw *in the theater* was Saving Private Ryan. No joke. It was quite disturbing to clearly understand every word of the German guy as he slowly lulled the American to death.

    And yet, I’d sooner choose to watch Saving Private Ryan again before that nasty Wedding Singer.

    Jon

    P.S. I have a 3-year-old boy, whom I just know is going to be *that* kid in the Primary program. I can’t wait. LOL. :)

  39. #19 and #32 both took mine.

    My first movie out of the mission was Saving Private Ryan. My mom took me, and didn’t prepare me at all. I was so traumatized that I covered my eyes after the one guy starts looking for his arm, and then left the theater. I think that was about 10 minutes into the movie. It’s not my best memory. Except for the 17-year old that came over to me in the lobby and hit on me, until part of the conversation led to when and where I’d gone to high school. His retreat was quite abrupt.

  40. #24: I’m quite confident that there is no element of church activity; no aspect of church history; no idiosyncrasy of church membership that has been more of a challenge to my faith and patience than the tendency in the church for unnecessarily-long meetings. It drives me crazy! Nuts! Berserk! I literally had to ask to be released as the stake exec secretary because I realized that if I remained in the calling even one more month I was going to go utterly bonkers. It was the call or my continued activity in the church.

    Some 30+ years ago, when I was an EQ President in a BYU ward, we were holding its ward conference and had a ward PEC meeting that was to take place before the church meetings themselves. Our stake president representative for that meeting was J. Reuben Clark III. We were late getting started for some reason — I think that one or more bishopric members might have been late showing up — and after the opening prayer, our bishop turned the time over to Pres. Clark.

    His first words to us were: “Brethren, there is no meeting in the Church so unimportant that it cannot begin on time, and there is no meeting in the Church so important that it cannot end on time.”

    I’ve done my best to live by those words ever since. And Lou Hampton probably did as fine a job as bishop to implement that philosophy as I have ever seen. ..bruce..

  41. His first words to us were: “Brethren, there is no meeting in the Church so unimportant that it cannot begin on time, and there is no meeting in the Church so important that it cannot end on time.”

    Now if we could only add this phrase to the Articles of Faith and make primary children learn it, as well as add it to the temple recommend interview in some fashion, then we might see some real change. Until then . . .

  42. I love that quote bruce! It’s similar to one my former SP is famous for: “Brethren, it takes a damn good meeting to be better than no meeting at all.”

  43. Two great quotes. I am going to use them regularly.

  44. OK, this whole discussion has prompted me to discuss Lou’s efforts in more detail. MCQ, please let me know if I can use your Stake President’s quote; it’s a great one. ..bruce..

  45. I was friends with someone who used to be the president of a very small branch. During one sacrament meeting, right after the administration of the sacrament, he asked one of his counsellors to bear his testimony. He got up and gave the closing prayer, and everyone dispersed.

    Thank goodness this was before the consolidated schedule.