Indiana Jones Is The Avatar Of Mormonism’s Intellectual Golden Age

By Megan Harris & Matt B

 

Thesis: We would like to remind you all that Indiana Jones is definitely Mormon. Probably a jack-Mormon, but definitely a Mormon.  In fact, to understand Indiana Jones is to understand post-Brigham Young, pre-David O. McKay Mormonism: the era sometimes called the golden age of Mormon intellectual life.

Postulate: The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles do not exist.

Proofs:

1:  Indiana Jones was a Boy Scout in Utah in 1912. This is approximately the time that the Church officially began sponsoring Boy Scout troops, hoping that the Boy Scouts would inculcate the sorts of virtues that the Church wanted young men to adopt. Young Indiana Jones learned these lessons well: he’s self-reliant, good with tools, and has an unshakable commitment to the veracity of Biblical miracles.

Indiana Jones takes the sacrament to his sick father

2:  Since Indiana Jones was a Boy Scout when he was, he was born in the 1890s, probably in Utah. His father is a European immigrant who likely came to the United States in the 1880s or 1870s. He is also by his accent a native of the British Isles, where some forty thousand people joined the Church in the nineteenth century. Thousands of these migrated to Utah, like Henry Jones, Sr.

3: Both father and son have deep religious interests and are obsessed with languages, translations, and religious records. Obviously they are marked deeply by the legacy of Joseph Smith, Jr. But they’re also men of their age: the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are the time when Mormons, newly interested in academia, grew interested in demonstrating the truth of the Book of Mormon and Bible using the tools of scholarship. No doubt the Joneses knew well George Reynolds’s 1880s attempts to apply archaeology to the Book of Mormon, and they were probably involved in the growing interest in the subject at the LDS schools. In 1903 Provo hosted a Book of Mormon geography conference; in 1904 Brigham Young College issued a “Report” on “Book of Mormon geography.” The emerging consensus of Mormon intellectuals in the era was that archaeology could link the Book of Mormon to the ancient peoples of Mesoamerica.

4: Some of these Mormons were among the steady stream of Latter-day Saints who left Utah to study at American universities in Chicago, Michigan and Boston in the early twentieth century. No doubt young Henry Jones, Jr., was one such. Indeed, we might see in Indiana Jones the very fears that some church leaders like J. Reuben Clark held: his fancy college education obviously led to his inactivity and decision to remain back east to teach at Marshall College in Connecticut. But like so many other inactive Mormon scholars of the day, Indiana clearly retained a lot of affection for his youthful Christian faith. Clearly Indiana knows when to kneel before God, and he’s familiar enough with Mormon scripture that he thinks Jehovah starts with a J.

It’s not sacrament meeting without an element of danger

We might look at Indiana’s face and see the generation of gruff voiced general authorities who struck a balance between their rugged cowboy upbringing and their starched collar mainstream education. He straddles the line between religious mysticism and intellectual skepticism, and he embodies the era of Mormon assimilation.

Brother Jones in simpler times

In most movies today, the scientist is incredulous to whatever supernatural wonder is revealing itself to the world. The phrase “This cannot be!” is nearly always on their lips. What makes Indiana, and therefore early intellectual Mormonism, so refreshing for many, is the seemingly effortless way science and the mysterious seem to meet. Like Superman, Dr. Jones has his bespectacled alter-ego in a suit, but unlike Superman, it’s not a disguise. He’s Dr. Jones in both worlds.

Comments

  1. Kevin Barney says:

    Awesome.

  2. This wins everything.

  3. J. Stapley says:

    Brilliant.

  4. May this go viral to the whole world.

  5. I’ve thought a lot about this and I’m pretty sure it checks out

  6. Hadn’t really thought about it, but now that you mention it, makes perfect sense!

  7. Happy Hubby says:

    I love it. I think there is some analogy with “rough stone rolling”, but I am too tired right now to formulate it.

  8. Indy is totally a jack mormon, and I love it.

  9. This will all be confirmed in the next gospel topics essay. Every jot and tittle.

  10. Aaron Brown says:

    I know this is true.

    Aaron B

  11. Brilliant.

    Henry Sr. must also be a jack mormon too, given his unrepentant extramarital dalliance with Elsa. They probably both went inactive after the death of Mrs Jones.

  12. Aussie Mormon says:

    I’ll have fun next time I get asked to do a lesson.

  13. It’s more likely he’s Catholic when you consider his persona in the films. Wikipedia actually has this listed as his religion. SLC had a large cathedral completed in 1900, so there were obviously plenty of Catholics around.

  14. Jason K. says:

    Brilliant!

  15. Larry the Cable Guy says:

    Another clue:

    “If you think I’m going to Delhi with you, or anyplace else after all the trouble you’ve gotten me into, think again, buster! I’m going home to Missouri where they never feed you snakes before ripping your heart out and lowering you into hot pits! This is NOT my idea of a swell time!”
    –Willie from The Temple of Doom

    And, the most compelling slice of Mormonism in the whole series:
    “I was just remembering the last time we had a quiet drink together. I had a milkshake.”
    –Indiana Jones from The Last Crusade

  16. And Yoda is Spencer W. Kimball…

  17. Other movie heroes that are almost certainly Mormon:

    Snake Plisskin
    Dr. Zaius
    Wedge Antilles
    Xi the Bushman
    Toecutter

  18. I read this first yesterday in the fog of post-op anesthesia, and thought i was dreaming. But one day on, with my cognitive powers fully restored, it’s all still true. Amen, and Amen, and Amen.

  19. Dr. Zaius!

  20. SLC had a large cathedral completed in 1900, so there were obviously plenty of Catholics around.

    Also, the Great Brain was set in the same period.

  21. Talon, this won’t be confirmed in the next Gospel Topics essay. It IS the next Gospel Topics essay. And it appears the voting is in the unanimous.

  22. I know it, and I know that God knows it, and I cannot deny it, neither dare I do it; at least I know that by so doing I would offend God, and come under condemnation.

  23. Anita Hales says:

    For those who are saying he might be Catholic, it’s true there was a cathedral in SLC. However, that’s not where Indy’s home was. It was in southern Utah which was less likely to have a Catholic presence.

  24. The Great Brain peterllc mentions was set in Southern Utah, and is about a Catholic family.

  25. In 1873 a Catholic high mass was sung in the St. George Tabernacle by the St. George Tabernacle choir, with the local Catholic priest officiating. That’s southern Utah enough for me. Don’t write off Indy as a Jack Mormon yet!

  26. You're Actually Reading This? says:

    If you’ve watched The Young Indiana Jones, you would know that he’s not from Utah.

  27. Aussie Mormon says:

    Hence the: “Postulate: The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles do not exist.” at the start of the article.

  28. Except the oldest Boy Scout Troop in Utah, Troop 0051 of Provo wasn’t founded until 1916. In order for Indy to be a part of an organized troop in 1912, the only viable choice historically is to make him a part of Troop 0005 out of Denver. Given he hops a train in order to get part of the way home from visiting Moab likely puts his home base in Grand Junction, Colorado over the border, in Gentile territory.

    But given we’re talking about a franchise that created crystalline aliens, historicity shouldn’t be too hard to get around.

  29. Tino Bo Bino says:

    ldsliving.com – “Indiana Jones is definitely Mormon.” and then bycommonconsent.com asks us to suspend a whole series of canon and just pretend that “the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles do not exist.”

    But sure, other than the fact that Lucas and Disney purposefully established YIJC as canon by going out of their way to secure Harrison Ford’s portrayal of Indy in Episode 11 of the series we’re supposed to forget happened.

    Aside that even in movie canon, Indy refers to YIJC pilot episode events during KCS.

    Or the fact that Wikipedia, George Lucas, and Lucasfilm’s own archive list Dr. Henry Jones, Jr. as Catholic.

    …As well as novelized canon of his Catholicism – Indiana Jones and the Dinosaur Eggs, Bantam Books, Paperback

    Indy is cool and all, but it shouldn’t be hard to find an actual real-life LDS adventurer that did exciting and naughty things like Indy does in stories?
    Like · Reply · Just now

  30. never forget says:

    There isn’t anyone who is LDS that is cool enough to be Indy in the past or the future.
    The best we can claim is the longest consecutive winner of Jeopardy and that crappy kid who was on American Idol that left to do a mission or something. Oh, and that Tom Hanks would totally be Mormon if he’s grandma had taken him to church for a few more months. God job Grandma Hanks!

  31. The argument here is interesting to read, but seems more like wishful thinking.

    1st. Monument Valley is on the Utah Arizona border. The assumption here is that since the film starts in Utah that the scout troop is from Utah then Indy got on the train and headed somewhere farther into Utah and of course everyone in Utah is a Mormon(which isn’t true…even back then) We don’t know what direction the train was going and it isn’t unusual for scouts to travel before they set out on a trek.

    Spielberg lived in Arizona and became a boy scout while living in Phoenix. It would seem more likely that a close friend like George Lucas would write a father son narrative about a Boy Scout from Arizona as an tribute to his friend. That friend would also know about Spielberg troubled past with his father. This would appeal to the director since he wants to reconcile that relationship in reality. So, it seems more likely that the scout troop is from Arizona and the train took him futther into Arizona. The closest towns to monument valley are in Arizona.

    2nd. Why are the Joneses in Arizona? Well, it doesn’t really matter to the story does it? Again it seems more likely that Indy is a representation of Spielberg and his youthful adventurism that he expressed in his filmmaking at a early age. If we had to have a backstory I would think it would make sense that Henry Sr was tracing the path of the early Spanish catholic explorers and the possibility that the holy grail was passed though the Catholic Church somehow. This is where Indy would have learned about the cross of Coronado.

    3. Mormons were not the only people studying archeology in Chicago at the time. There we’re some, but definitely not the majority by any means. This bit I think was intended to be a bit tongue in cheek. But I give points for creativity.

    The theory is fun but it seems like a stretch

  32. Nice theory but, I am not sure if you took the Young Indiana Jones series into account. Although he and his father lived in Utah for awhile after returning from a trip around yhe world and the death of his mother prior to his trip around the world as a 9-10 year old his family lived elsewhere. In his late teens he and his father again lived elsewhere. Although likely exposed to the church and possibly agreeing with it, and although we don’t know how long he and his father were in Utah, it doesn’t prove that he or his father joined the church.

  33. Nice theory but, I am not sure if you took the Young Indiana Jones series into account. Although he and his father lived in Utah for awhile after returning from a trip around yhe world and the death of his mother prior to his trip around the world as a 9-10 year old his family lived elsewhere. In his late teens he and his father again lived elsewhere. Although likely exposed to the church and possibly agreeing with it, and although we don’t know how long he and his father were in Utah, it doesn’t prove that he or his father joined the church. Even if he did join I doubt it was a college education that made him inactive, but what he did during World War I before he ever went to college as a student.

  34. Richard B Riddick says:

    Idiots. He wasn’t Mormon. Look up the canon

  35. Snake Plisken. Yup.

  36. Actually, anyone who’s seen Tarantino’s “Kill Bill” movies knows that unlike other heroes in disguise, Superman goes in the opposite tact: he don’s the manner, though obviously not hiding his face, of the ‘mild-mannered reporter’, but, he’s ALWAYS ‘Superman’, whereas the other “heroes” put on the customer and become it. Henry Jones, Jr. has traits of BOTH…even bespectacled and wearing a suit in the college lecture room, he’s still “Indy”, and when out in the field (and not in the library, as he advises one student in KOTCS), wearing the Fedora and wielding the bull whip, he’s still “Doctor Jones”, as the Maharajah’s PM Chattar Lal quickly recognizes when Indy, Short Round, and Willie show up at Pankot Palace. It’s true that he’s always “Dr. Jones” regardless of attire, but more than likely that Indy doesn’t bring most of his ‘swashbuckling’ in the field, as he treasures his reputation, in spite of the widespread accusations of being an opportunist and a grave-robber. For example, Indy, when queried by Chattar Lal as to why he was most unwelcome in Madagascar by its Sultan, clarifies that it was NOT his hand or his HEAD that the Sultan threatened to have amputated if Indy ever set foot in his kingdom again.

    Judging by the events of the opening sequence of TLC, yes, it’s likely that both Henry Jones, Sr. and his son, Henry (“Indiana”) Jr., were at least inactive LDS members, living in, judging by the Desert terrain, in Southern Utah. Since the Boy Scout troop is seen riding their horses past the Double Arches, not far from Moab Utah, it can be assumed that the Jones family lives in Moab, and later the crew of roughnecks enlists the help of the Grand County Sheriff in retrieving the cross of Coronado back to the white-suited “Panama Hat” fellow that the sheriff believes to be the rightful owner and won’t press charges against Indy. The town and the train sequence were actually filmed in Colorado, and I believe that the rail line continues through south-central Utah,following present-day Interstate 70, so young Indy would have had a LONG hike from escaping the train to run all the way home.

  37. I really, really hope people take this post more seriously

  38. Erik

    The closest towns to Monument Valley in Arizona (Kayenta, etc.) are on the Navajo Indian reservation. Are you suggesting that in addition to being Mormon Indy and his father (or perhaps his mother) were Native American?

  39. Jade Peverell says:

    Had sex with lots of women and got one pregnant. Also had sex with the same woman his dad did.

  40. Who, Erik or Indy?

  41. Tim Whiting says:

    Those people saying that the LDS Church has never produced anyone as cool as Indy have obviously forgotten about Porter Rockwell

  42. Ann Smith says:

    You guys have to much time on your hands! Hahaha

  43. never forget says:

    Porter Rockwell is a LDS urban legend. He exists the same way that the Three Nephites have personally intervened in each mission every three years to save a set of sister missionaries.

  44. Obviously, and so is Han Solo.

  45. Jacqueline Taylor says:

    I definitely think that Indiana Jones was a Mormon, but it is just a shame he went inactive. In the films when his father is involved you can hear the accent from Europe.

  46. Dave Hapeman says:

    A one reason why he was not LDS:
    Since his fellow scouts were all wearing full uniforms, it is highly unlikely they were part of an LDS unit. ;)

  47. BREAKING NEWS: Title of the new 2019 Indiana Jones movie has been leaked – Indiana Jones and the Sword of Laban.

  48. Susan Trammell says:

    Now, if only the actor portraying Indiana Jones could only fly an airplane!

  49. Dr. and Mrs. Donald E. Goff, Ph.D. says:

    Both father and son were fornicators, who broke the law of chastity, not righteous honorable men.

  50. Dear Mrs. Goff, Ph.D.:

    Has there ever been such a thing as a fornicator who did NOT break the law of chastity?

  51. Sounds like “Mormon folklore” since the Church is so into record keeping, it should be rather easy to find the names on Church records, somewhere in this age of information ,thus reducing any doubt makes good for a space filler and and fantastic yarn !

  52. Rick McGurk says:

    Judge not. They both repented. I’ve known all along they were Mormon.

  53. Ok, how many (like me) went onto FamilySearch to see what records are there?

  54. I really liked the premise of this treatise. I hope I said it correctly. I am grateful for the chance to now have a different perspective on the Jones.

    Thank you.
    Regards,
    William

  55. Grandpa Chet says:

    This is as much fun as Philip Jose Farmer’s speculations that every adventure hero is related to each other. (see Tarzan Alive or Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life.)

  56. Angela C says:

    This thought also occurred to me when he was revealed in the 3rd movie to be a boy scout in Utah. I mean, he’d kind of have to be at that point (in 1912). Clearly, a jack Mormon, though. It didn’t really occur to me that his dad would be a Mormon convert (also clearly a jack Mormon).

  57. Robert Starling says:

    The real Mormon Indiana Jones is Dr. Richard Hauck – former CIA and accomplished archaeologist. Find his work at http://www.BMAF.org

  58. “Had sex with lots of women and got one pregnant.”

    Indiana Jones or Joseph Smith? (bah-dum-pah!)

  59. Forget Indiana Jones. I believe Harrison Ford would make a very good Mormon. The whole problem is how do the missionaries find him? I understand he’s a pretty secretive guy.

  60. I got a chuckle out of this hypothesis…

  61. Richard B Riddick says:

    LOL, Porter Rockwell. Dude takes a shot at Govenor Boggs and misses. Porter died 3 weeks before going to trial on multiple accounts of murder. What a cool guy. Look it up if you don’t believe me

  62. All except for the failed meso-american BoM geographical location. Indiana would know better to look to the Heartland in North America as well as the Adena and Hopewell cultures and their timelines.

  63. Rick Platts says:

    “Probably a Jack Mormon”, umm, yeah. Definitely a clever take on a classic hero. Well done, Matt & Megan!

  64. A recent article was put out by “By Common Consent” (BCC) attempting to “prove” that Indiana Jones (fictitious creation of George Lucas) is Mormon. BCC claims that they “seek truth, reason, and honesty with our perspectives on faith.”, but this article indicates they do anything but that. When I first read this I thought the article to be satirical (and kind of still do) because of their wild claims they call “proofs”. Many members however have reached out and shared this with me, stating that they believe this to be true and in some cases that it has “strengthened their testimony of the veracity of the church.” As such I’ve typed out a quick response to all of the 4 points made in the article to explain why it would appear Indiana Jones is in fact not a Mormon.
    Claim 1: Proofs: Indiana Jones was a Boy Scout in Utah in 1912. This is approximately the time that the Church officially began sponsoring Boy Scout troops, hoping that the Boy Scouts would inculcate the sorts of virtues that the Church wanted young men to adopt. Young Indiana Jones learned these lessons well: he’s self-reliant, good with tools, and has an unshakable commitment to the veracity of Biblical miracles.
    Counterclaim 1: Indiana Jones was a Boy Scout, and he was in Utah at the time of the third movie, however these facts do not prove he was Mormon for a couple reasons.
    Firstly, the LDS church began BSA sponsorship in 1913 (notice how the author conveniently approximated when the church began sponsorship so as to elude that the church was sponsoring Indiana’s troop) not in 1912. A few wards had attempted a scouting program in 1912, however it was a small minority and statistically unlikely that his was one of them. Secondly, the majority of Boy Scouts then and now were not Mormon’s. Even today now that the LDS church is the largest sponsor of BSA, only about 17% of their traditional membership is registered in units sponsored by the Mormon Church. The first troop, Troop 1, was formed in 1910 in St Paul, Minnesota by the Catholic Church by the way.
    The values listed such as self-reliance, good with tools, and veracity of biblical miracles, are not mormon-specific at all so i’m not sure why that was included. Additionally, if you use the character argument (his good values like self-reliance, good with tools, etc) as “proof” that he is a Mormon then I would ask you to remain consistent with this argument, particularly during his adult life when he commits a number of sins, namely alcoholic consumption, premarital sex, and murder.
    Conclusion: This information neither proves nor disproves any connection to the LDS Church. Statistically speaking however, it is very unlikely he was in a Mormon sponsored Boy Scout troop.
    Claim 2: Since Indiana Jones was a Boy Scout when he was, he was born in the 1890s, probably in Utah. His father is a European immigrant who likely came to the United States in the 1880s or 1870s. He is also by his accent a native of the British Isles, where some forty thousand people joined the Church in the nineteenth century. Thousands of these migrated to Utah, like Henry Jones, Sr.
    Counterclaim 2: Many of the purported facts presented here are not facts but simply the writers optimistic opinions. Here is what we know: His father was born in Scotland, studied at Oxford University, and eventually ended up in Utah at the time of the third movie – everything else is pure speculation.
    There wasn’t anything statistically unique about religious immigrants from that time period either, the vast majority were non-Mormon, so going off the data it is actually more reasonable to believe that he was not a Mormon convert at the time of his immigration to America.
    Conclusion: I’m surprised this point was even included. Nothing here gives us any insight into him being/not being Mormon.
    Claim 3: Both father and son have deep religious interests and are obsessed with languages, translations, and religious records. Obviously they are marked deeply by the legacy of Joseph Smith, Jr. But they’re also men of their age: the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are the time when Mormons, newly interested in academia, grew interested in demonstrating the truth of the Book of Mormon and Bible using the tools of scholarship. No doubt the Joneses knew well George Reynolds’s 1880s attempts to apply archaeology to the Book of Mormon, and they were probably involved in the growing interest in the subject at the LDS schools. In 1903 Provo hosted a Book of Mormon geography conference; in 1904 Brigham Young College issued a “Report” on “Book of Mormon geography.” The emerging consensus of Mormon intellectuals in the era was that archaeology could link the Book of Mormon to the ancient peoples of Mesoamerica.
    Counterclaim 3: It is true that they (though mostly the father) were interested in religions, translations, and records. This however does not prove any connection to Mormonism, in fact it suggests the opposite. Firstly there is no evidence anywhere of Mormon scripture, theology, or acknowledgement despite there being ample evidence of Christian and Catholic scripture and theology. Using your own argument you must logically conclude that he is Catholic as most his literature is so based. I could go on in detail about this, or you could honestly watch the movie and pay attention to all the Catholic elements. Their interest in ancient languages is more indicative of a Catholic or Protestant believer. Many religious Catholics for example will study these languages to read from the original languages (Biblical Aramaic and Hebrew and Koine Greek) to better understand the bible. Many church services will read from these older languages and encourage their study. I’ve yet to attend one single Mormon service that does a critique of any passage of scripture from the original text, that is from any older language! Most Mormons I’ve talked to don’t even know what language the bible was written in! Lastly their interest in records appears to be all or mostly biblically based, and there is absolutely no evidence of any interest in mormon records. The writer concludes this paragraph with more wild speculation I don’t need to reiterate, suffice it to say there is no evidence anywhere to support Henry or Indiana being “marked deeply” (or marked at all) by any Mormon nor having any interest in BOM archeology.
    Conclusion: The movies indicate that a Catholic faith is most likely here. There is no evidence anywhere of Mormonism.
    Claim 4: Some of these Mormons were among the steady stream of Latter-day Saints who left Utah to study at American universities in Chicago, Michigan and Boston in the early twentieth century. No doubt young Henry Jones, Jr., was one such. Indeed, we might see in Indiana Jones the very fears that some church leaders like J. Reuben Clark held: his fancy college education obviously led to his inactivity and decision to remain back east to teach at Marshall College in Connecticut. But like so many other inactive Mormon scholars of the day, Indiana clearly retained a lot of affection for his youthful Christian faith. Clearly Indiana knows when to kneel before God, and he’s familiar enough with Mormon scripture that he thinks Jehovah starts with a J.
    We might look at Indiana’s face and see the generation of gruff voiced general authorities who struck a balance between their rugged cowboy upbringing and their starched collar mainstream education. He straddles the line between religious mysticism and intellectual skepticism, and he embodies the era of Mormon assimilation.
    In most movies today, the scientist is incredulous to whatever supernatural wonder is revealing itself to the world. The phrase “This cannot be!” is nearly always on their lips. What makes Indiana, and therefore early intellectual Mormonism, so refreshing for many, is the seemingly effortless way science and the mysterious seem to meet. Like Superman, Dr. Jones has his bespectacled alter-ego in a suit, but unlike Superman, it’s not a disguise. He’s Dr. Jones in both worlds.
    Counterclaim 4: Paragraph 4 starts and ends with no evidence presented. The opinions about Indiana here are not based on facts, but on the writers preconceived belief that Indiana Jones is Mormon and therefore everything he does must indicate that. I will thus leave the reader to draw their own conclusions on BCC’s opinions. I will discuss however the middle part as some evidence is provided. Firstly the argument is made about his knowledge of kneeling before God as another evidence of Mormonism even though virtually every Christian denomination believes in respect and kneeling before God. The second point the writer makes is that of the spelling of Jehovah. The writer makes the assumption that because Indiana’s first instinct is to spell Jehovah with a J, that this is proof of his Mormon roots. In actuality all English translations of the bible spell Jehovah the same, starting with the letter J. The confusion of the J vs I has nothing to do with English spelling, rather with the English vs Latin spelling (if you watch the movie you’ll catch this). It is interesting to note however that this same point is evidence against a Mormon Indiana Jones. According to Mormon teaching, Elohim is the name of God, not Jehovah (Jesus Christ’s name in the Old Testament). Therefore your own logic suggests Jones is anything but Mormon as Jones considers the name of God to be Jehovah, not Elohim.
    Conclusion: The evidence here is mostly neutral or irrelevant, except in the case of Jehovah being the name of God, where it is convincingly opposed to a Mormon Indiana Jones.

  65. P Chambers says:

    Gee, no offense intended but get a grip people! You are debating the religion of a FICTIONAL character…I repeat Fictional…

  66. I noticed you copied my term “”fictional” creation of George Lucas”. I think everyone here is well aware of the nature of the article. My response here is to protect those Mormons who have messaged me stating they are strengthening their testimony off of articles like this which are not meant to be taken so seriously! Why then do you take such offense to someone’s opinion? If you doubt the counterarguments presented by me please be specific and we can address those, I only want to provide truthful and accurate information.

  67. Not at all Monument Valley! Try Arches Natl Park. Next to Moab, Utah Monument Valley is the name of the trail in Arches! Who even knew about Egyptology and secret messages on stones, and prophets translating messages from headstones from the staff of Ra? It was probabally reformed Egyptian, don’t ya think

  68. Olde Skool says:

    This thread. Wowza.

  69. additional evidence is massively abundant of Indy being a jack Mormon. consider the following
    1. knows of all gold in hands of lamanites in s. America. even in Peru and Bolivia missionaries as late as 60s-70s wore their leather Indy jackets
    2, Ark of Covenant was the reason Indy and Marcus got into archeology in the first place
    3. The power within the Ark was well known by Indy and could only be handled by righteous.
    4. The battle with secret combinations has existed since the beginning. Indy was one of the warriors.
    5. Indy was destined, even preordained to care for sacred objects of Jehova
    6. One calling he had was to protect the remnant of the Jaredite stones, touched by finger of god
    to provide help for his humble sons and daughters.
    7. Those Kali worshippers working their secret combinations, stole those stones, captured the
    strippling sons of people, and sought for power thru idol worship. Ya know thats not gonna work
    8. These idol worshiper’s leader was one who had escaped, no doubt, from the bottomless pit
    where the lake of fire and brimstone roared. Great escape Indy.
    9. Like present missionaries Indy learned to eat what was presented to him by his hosts-even
    if it consisted of live eels and chilled monkey brains.
    10. Indy knew the winding Canyonlands on southern Utah which helped him find the canyon of the cresent moon where the holy grail was protected by an “almost” translated Knight whose calling it was to protect holy grail. Indy had learned the signs to pass the pitfalls guarding the Knight with the grail.
    11. Henry Jones senior, an early convert from Scotland had spent a lifetime quest following the King
    Arthur legends of the grail and how any why the grail came to England.
    12. Even Indy knew mysteries needed inspired wisdom to be solved, and that “X” never marked the spot. (at least most of the time)
    13. Indy knew how to use the voices from the dust to solve these mysteries.
    `14. Knowing the workings of secret combinations, is it any wonder Indy ended up fighting the Soviets lusting for occult power. Only fast thinking saved him from the burning power in the Neveda desert.
    15 Indy had intuitive knowledge of unknown physical powers of the magnetic power and the power of light held by crystal. He must have found some Anastazi lightning stones wandering the Utah desert as a youth.
    `16. Even a life as a Jack Mormon eventually runs down and repentance is frequently found in the end. Indy marries Marion as part of his repentance.
    17, Some of you have said he was a Catholic. If so he would have said (of Cortez’ Cross)
    “This thing belongs in the Vatican”
    18. and just wait for the next installment: Voices from the Dust-Indiana Jones and the Prophets of the Third Temple

    PROFF ENOUGH FOR YOU

  70. Thanks Joseph for your well thought out counter arguments. I am now more convinced than ever that Indiana Jones was in fact a Mormon.

  71. How can anyone be so disillusioned with reality that they would believe baseless conjecture made by people who obviously have no semblance of what empirical evidence and logical thinking are?

  72. Fricative says:

    -_- Not sure if Poe’s Law applies to Rick or me…

  73. This thread is amazing and proves, definitively, that we are a lost cause as a people. That we voted en masse for Trump — a corrupt, pornography-promoting casino magnate who proudly boasts he can sexually assault women by grabbing their genitalia and kissing them without their consent without any consequences because of his fame and wealth and who has defrauded virtually every business partner he has ever had, inheriting a fortune but then running his businesses into the ground repeatedly, declaring bankruptcy six times and thereby defrauding the taxpayer, creditors, and shareholders of hundreds of millions of dollars — is the least of our problems at this point.

  74. mike pilkington says:

    what could possible leave us disillusioned. Where or what is truth these days? Science empirical evidence. Logical thinking. Internet comments. Scholarship. MSN. Fox. Actually the question What is Truth was once asked by Pontius Pilate. Would he now be able to answer? What qualifications must one have to have some semblance of empirical evidence or logical thinking?
    Is there somewhere I can get a degree in that? But judging from the last comment, that might be the least of our problems right now. I must assert my right to remain a lost cause. and perhaps remain a deplorable.